Program

Course Descriptions

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY OF ART AND ARCHITECTURE
DEPARTMENT OF STUDIO ARTS
DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS
DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY OF ART AND ARCHITECTURE

Architectural Studies – Introductory courses

HAA 0040 Introduction to Western Architecture

  • 3 credits
  • offered every fall and spring semester
  • required for architectural studies majors

This course introduces students to the art of architecture from the ancient world until today, emphasizing the western tradition. The course works both chronologically as a history of phases and styles, and methodologically, examining the contextual issues that give each period a distinctive architecture. Students who take this course will learn to understand and make critical judgments on buildings and be ready for more specialized studies in the history of architecture.

HAA 0041 Introduction to Architecture Writing Practicum

  • 1 credit

This section is an optional adjunct to HAA 0040. Students who wish to take it must register for HAA 0040, CRN 12295 also, including one of the regular weekly section meetings. This special writing section will concentrate on conceptualizing and articulating architecture, both in standing buildings – primarily in Pittsburgh – and in historical architecture. Writing, reading, and rewriting are key elements in the course.

 

HAA 0940 Approaches to the Built Environment

  • 3 credits

Through a series of units dealing with different architectural issues and building types (Representation; Landscape; Dwelling; Commerce and Industry; Public Institutions; Sacred Spaces), students will be introduced to ideas and problems that affect the way in which the built environment has been and continues to be shaped in a variety of historical and cultural contexts. We will think broadly about how the spaces that people move through and inhabit in their daily lives shape and are shaped by human behavior, cultural identity, political experience, and the currents of historical circumstance. Contemporary buildings and projects will figure prominently as examples of how designers currently approach architectural, structural and urban problems. Local sites will serve as case-studies for the analysis of different aspects of the built environment. This class is taught in a seminar format with students evaluated on their class participation and assigned projects. Readings and projects will introduce students to a variety of techniques for analyzing and representing the built environment, providing the basic tools for subsequent architectural research and studies.

Architectural Studies – Advanced Courses

 

HAA 1040 Architecture: Texts + Theory

  • 3 credits
  • required for architectural studies majors
  • satisfies the requirements for a writing-intensive course

The objectives of the course are to acquaint students with architectural themes in various literary genres, to examine the emergence and development of core ideas in the Western architectural tradition, and to understand the relationship between architectural ideas and the cultural contexts in which they were articulated. Engravings, photography and illustrations will be considered as important components of architectural texts; the format and composition of architectural books will be considered as integral to the ideas they contain.

Students will gain familiarity with sources and ideas central to modernism, including:

  • the construction of the architect and the engineer as distinct professional groups;
  • the classical theory of imitation (mimesis) in the fine arts as it applies to architecture;
  • the impact of structural thinking in architectural theory;
  • the invention of architectural history and changing interpretation of styles;
  • the role of ornament in modern architectural discourse;
  • the emergence of the “primitive” as a positive aesthetic category;
  • the emergence of the moral concept of “honesty” in modern architectural thought.

Students will learn strategies for approaching and interpreting texts, such as:

  • the importance of etymology in interpretation of aesthetic vocabulary;
  • the concept of intertextuality as a means to understand the development of theoretical ideas.

These learning objectives will be assessed through class discussion, papers written during class time in response to readings, and formal papers based on close reading of primary sources.

 

HAA 1900 Architectural Studies Internship

  • 3 credits
  • required for architectural studies majors

Academic credit is awarded for practical professional experience gained through a directed internship. The internship is arranged by the student through the Architectural Studies Office (104 Frick Fine Arts Building) in consultation with the Academic Advisor or the Director of Architectural Studies. Open to advanced Architectural Studies majors with a QPA of 2.75 or higher. Students must consult with the undergraduate advisor and program director to get approval for the internship. Link to Internship Information Sheet

 

HAA 1912 Architecture + Digital Media 1

  • 3 credits

This course is an introductory architectural design studio in which AutoCAD software will be taught through the process of developing a small design project. Students will thus gain a working knowledge of AutoCAD in concert with refining two- and three-dimensional design skills. The course is intended to acquaint students with concepts, processes and skills required by professionals in the field to create and modify computer-generated drawings. Students will learn the commands and functions necessary to input, process, and output working drawings in the form of plans, elevations and sections.  In addition to the fundamental design methods and practices for the creation of architectural drawings, exercises will focus on concepts such as scaling, dimensioning and lettering. 

 

HAA 1913 Foundation Studio 1

  • 3 credits
  • offered every fall semester
  • required for architectural studies majors

This course introduces a fundamental approach to architectural design. Through a continuous sequence of design projects, students will learn to develop a set of principles that inform/dictate the production of architecture. These principles will be used to clarify the interrelationship of geometry, form, and composition, thus defining a systematic strategy for an architectural solution. Additionally, various methodologies, including case study analysis, site analysis, analytical diagramming, and strategic programming, will be taught in order to further inform this solution. The design principles, in coordination with the methodologies, will allow students develop an understanding of the complex relationship between design practice and architectural discourse. Finally, a range of drawing and model-making skills will be introduced as a means of seeing, understanding and presenting.          

 

HAA 1914 Architecture + Design Media 2

  • 3 credits
  • offered every spring semester
  • required for architectural studies majors

This course, taken by Architectural Studies Majors in the spring of their sophomore or junior years acquaints students with autocad and current computer applications with a particular emphasis on how these programs are used in the architectural profession.  The course is desgined to provide students with the skills needed to secure the internship that is required for the major.

HAA 1916 Architecture Design Studio 1

  • 6 credits
  • offered every spring semester
  • prerequisite: HAA 1913 – Architectural Studies Seminar

Architecture Design Studio 1 is the first in a two-course sequence of design studios for Architectural Studies majors who wish to pursue a professional degree in architecture at the graduate level (M.Arch.). The course is restricted to Architectural Studies majors, and is offered in a studio format limited to 20 students. Ideally, students will enroll in their sophomore year, or at the latest in their junior year. Architectural Design Studio 1 is a prerequisite for HAA 1917, Architecture Design Studio 2.

Architecture Design Studio 1 will build on technical skills developed in HAA 1913 and will introduce students to a more sophisticated, three-dimensional design methodology. The design process examined in this studio is concerned with context as a potential driver for architectural design and examines the relationship between building and the urban fabric in which it is situated. A series of procedural exercises will enhance students’ awareness of the complex and layered issues involved in architectural problem-solving. An intensive site research component will yield data that will be used to generate organizational systems – grids or patterns that will become the basis for planning a given site and generating building forms.

The design process will unfold in three stages:

  • Students will investigate historic, geographic, demographic, economic, and sociological aspects of a given neighborhood. Data will be analyzed and presented in both graphic and textual form. This contextual research will be used in several ways throughout the design process. First, the research will give students a better understanding of the nature and ethos of the neighborhood; second, it will be used to identify potential building sites; and third, the contextual research will be used to determine what development strategies might benefit the community and motivate revitalization.
  • Contextual research will be used to generate contextual mapping, the first of two abstract design tools that will be explored in the studio. Contextual mapping is an architectural design strategy whereby aspects of the site, such as street configurations, thresholds, building setbacks, etc. are represented in the form of force lines. The patterns created by overlapping the various force lines generate contextual maps. The force lines that make up the contextual map are what ultimately dictate the form of the new building, i.e. the angle, location and position of walls, floors, ceilings, and windows on a given site.
  • Students will subsequently explore folding as a second design tool that will allow them to generate three-dimensional form based on their contextual maps. During this component of the course, students will use the force lines of their contextual maps as creases or cuts on a malleable surface. They will then strategically fold and cut this surface along these lines creating volumes, solids, and voids.

During class time, students should be observing individual critiques, or working (alone or collaboratively) on their own projects when they are not working directly with an instructor. Students in Architecture Design Studio 1 are expected to formally present their work to invited critics (professional architects) several times during the semester and to have new work ready for informal review every week.

 

HAA 1917 Architecture Design Studio 2

  • 6 credits
  • offered every fall semester
  • prerequisite: HAA 1916 – Architecture Design Studio 1

Architecture Design Studio 2 is the capstone for Architectural Studies majors who wish to pursue a professional degree in architecture at the graduate level (M.Arch.). The course is restricted to Architectural Studies majors, and will be offered in a studio format limited to 20 students. Ideally, students will enroll in their junior year, or at the latest in their senior year. Students must have completed Architecture Design Studio 1 (HAA 1916) to be admitted into HAA 1917. HAA 1917 will provide students with the opportunity to work on a substantial design project that will become part of their portfolio for graduate school applications.

Architecture Design Studio 2 will build on conceptual and technical skills developed in HAA 1913 and HAA 1916. HAA 1917 will introduce students to a sophisticated, three-dimensional design methodology referred to as system-based design. System-based design is a compositional method used to generate complex but coherent three-dimensional forms. There are two components to this design tool: the concept and the system. The concept is the guiding idea used to describe each student’s overall approach to making a system of design rules. For the sake of simplicity, students will choose a single verb as their concept such as “ascending” or “floating”. The second component, the system, is a set of rules used to generate and manipulate elemental forms that support the concept. The system rules dictate the relationships and connections of the fundamental elements of architectural design, i.e. lines, planes, and volumes. Using graphic skills acquired in Studio Arts courses, students will develop a set of principles, in the abstract, that will ultimately be used to generate architectural form.

This studio will be divided into three parts, each building on the previous one towards a final design project:

  1. The first part will be focused on the introduction of system-based design and the development by each student of a set of rules governing the creation of a three-dimensional system that will ultimately be used to generate architectural form.
  2. The second part will consist of case study analysis, site analysis, and programming.
  3. The final part of the studio will combine the previous two. Combining the formal system developed in part 1 and data collected in part 2, students will be required to generate a coherent architectural project, represented in analytical drawings and models.

During class time, students should be observing individual critiques, or working (alone or collaboratively) on their own projects when they are not working directly with an instructor. Students in Architecture Design Studio 2 are expected to formally present their work to invited critics (professional architects) several times during the semester and to have new work ready for informal review every week.

Historic Preservation Courses

 

HAA 1920 Introduction to Historic Preservation

  • 3 credits
  • typically offered every spring

This course explores the goals, methods, and practice of historic preservation in the United States today through a variety of historical, theoretical, and practical points of view.  Through intensive reading, class discussion, field trips, case studies, and guest speakers representing various sectors of the preservation community in Pittsburgh, we will investigate, discuss, and write about such topics as:

  • The role of preservation and preservationists in understanding and influencing the built environment;
  • Philosophies and politics of preservation;
  • “Reading” buildings and landscapes for their cultural meanings;
  • The history of historic preservation and the development of modern preservation standards;
  • Protecting historic places and documenting their significance;
  • Historic districts and issues of community identity;
  • Historic preservation as a tool for urban revitalization;
  • Historic landscape preservation;
  • Economics of historic preservation;
  • Careers for professionals in historic preservation.

Since preservation can be seen in action throughout Pittsburgh, the course asks students to engage with the historic built environment of the city through case study research and field trips.  Field trips are an important and mandatory part of the class. 

 

HAA 1921 Documentation + Conservation Studio

  • 6 credits
  • prerequisites: HAA 1913 Architectural Studies Seminar; HAA 1920 Introduction to Historic Preservation

The Documentation + Conservation Studio is a site-specific, field work and studio course that will expand on the academic, regulatory and technical issues examined in HAA 1920 Introduction to Historic Preservation. Skills and knowledge will be acquired through an intensive, semester-long investigation of a historic site in Pittsburgh. Emphasis will be placed on (1) applying knowledge from readings to the study of a given site; (2) assembling information about the history of the site through primary research; (3) analysis and representation of the site through writing, photography and analytical drawing; (4) the development of a preservation plan for the site that will be formally presented at the end of the semester to stakeholders, neighborhood groups and preservation specialists.

The 6-credit value of the course reflects the following: (1) the acquisition of skills and knowledge that will be applied to a substantial, final Historic Structure Report; (2) the field-work and studio components of the course. The typical architecture or preservation studio emphasizes weekly, one-on-one contact between each student and the instructor. During class time, students should be observing individual critiques, or working (alone or collaboratively) on their own projects when they are not working directly with the instructor. Students in the Documentation + Conservation Studio are expected to formally present their work to invited critics (professionals, community members) at the end of the semester.

In 2008, HAA 1921 was offered on-site at the Waldorf School in Friendship.

HAA 1922 Preservation: Texts and Theory

  • 3 credits
  • prerequisite: HAA 1920 Introduction to Historic Preservation

The objectives of the course are to engage students with themes, ideas and points of view with which well-informed preservationists—and other practitioners concerned with the built environment—should be familiar.  Students will gain an understanding of preservation’s broader context of the changing built environment, the social, economic, and political forces that affect it, and tactics for bringing its history and meaning to light. 

The course presents and explores these issues in four thematic units: 

  • The first, The Rise of Historic Preservation and Post-Modernism in America, looks at the formation and codification of the historic preservation movement in the United States alongside the emergence of the post-modern movement in architecture during the 1960s.  
  • The second, History and Community, compares and contrasts the historical significance, successes, and shortcomings of two planned suburban communities: 1950s Levittown and 1990s Celebration, Florida. 
  • The third, Legality and Aesthetics, examines landmark decisions in preservation law, the politics of preservation, and issues of contextual design and community participation. The fourth, The Cultural Landscape, explores points of view about the meaning of our contemporary built environment to preservations of today and tomorrow. 

These learning objectives will be assessed through class discussion, papers written in response to readings, and formal papers based on close reading of primary sources.

 

History of Architecture Courses

HAA 0100 Special Topics (Ancient) - Ancient Cities

  • 3 credits

Cities and their architecture embody the personal goals and collective values of the planners, patrons, and people who occupy them. This course will survey the archaeological and literary evidence for ancient cities of the Near East (Mesopotamia, Egypt, Persia, Anatolia) and Mediterranean area (Greece, Italy), emphasizing the form of the city and its monuments as cultural ideas and as responses from planners, architects, and patrons to recurring problems, such as: the creation of distinctive architectural forms and urban spaces, problems that arise from the structural limitations of traditional materials and/or building methods, and the need to deal with large-scale projects economically, though the use of new materials, new construction methods, or new systems of organization.

HAA 0440 Frank Lloyd Wright

  • 3 credits

The course is an introduction to the major works of architecture by Frank Lloyd Wright, whose career spans much of the 20th century. His incomplete projects and goals to create an American-style architecture will be compared to his interests in Far Eastern architecture and the European art movements like Cubism and Bauhaus architecture.

HAA 0480 Modern Architecture

  • 3 credits

From the late eighteenth century, new processes and cultural phenomena that may be globally described as effects of modernization have impinged on architectural design and urban planning throughout the world. The development of new technologies and materials, of colonial expansion and extensive state planning in the nineteenth century, of multi-national corporations and sprawling urban centers in the twentieth century, continue to reshape societies and environments. Through case studies of texts, monuments and sites, this course will investigate the consequences of these trends on architectural design and thought from 1800 to the twentieth century.

HAA 0510 Pittsburgh Architecture and Urbanism

  • 3 credits

This course seeks to understand how we shape the physical environment of Pittsburgh, and how it shapes us. We will look at the physical environment of Pittsburgh: the topography, early patterns of settlement, the expansion of its industrial center, the creation of residential neighborhoods, the post-War renewal, and the urban implications of the current shift from production to a service-based economy. But the course goes beyond the book to study Pittsburgh's long-term urban patterns over the past few centuries, and how they created the Pittsburgh we see today. The "detail" in these patterns comes from our parallel study of the history of Pittsburgh architecture. Students will write a short paper – more impressionistic than research-based – on one of these urban issues.

HAA 1010 Approaches to Art History

  • 3 credits
  • offered every fall and spring semester
  • topics change every semester

HAA 1100 Special Topics (Ancient) - Greek Architecture

  • 3 credits

Greek architecture has a familiar look to it since the formal vocabulary, and the problems of spatial organization, proportion, and statics that were formulated by Greek architects of the archaic and classical periods had a major impact on the development of later European and American architecture. Rather than focusing on the influence of Greek architecture, however, the course will examine the development of this tradition within its original, ancient setting, looking in particular at the mix of cultural and historical factors that resulted in the "look" that we associate with this formal building tradition today.

HAA 1160 Roman Architecture

  • 3 credits
  • offered every spring semester

The course will examine the development of Roman architecture from its origins in Etruria and Central Italy to the High Empire (ca. 150 AD). Special attention will be given to 1) the relationship of architectural forms, types and functions to changes in Roman politics and society, 2) the significance of materials and outside influences for the development of local Italian traditions and forms, and 3) the problems of interpreting the development of an ancient building tradition, when the monuments themselves are so fragmentarily preserved.

HAA 1235 English Medieval Architecture

  • 3 credits

This Honors Seminar, cross-listed as HAA 2200 for graduate credit, focuses on the portion of Canterbury Cathedral that was built in the early years of the pilgrimage cult of St Thomas Becket, itself the context for Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales. Constructed between 1174 and 1184, the Early Gothic choir of Canterbury is held to be the earliest Gothic structure in England and the one there that most nearly resembles the French originators of this style. The history of this choir is informed by the most varied array of primary documents that exists for any medieval structure and the changes in the design that still can be seen in the building demonstrate that the history of its construction was unusually complex. Both the documents and the archaeology of the structure offer an unrivaled opportunity for detective work in the exploration of a building and it dramatic story.

HAA 1240 Romanesque Architecture

  • 3 credits

This course will deal primarily with the churches and secondarily with the castles and houses surviving in Western Europe from the first mature period of post-Antique Europe, 1050-1200. It marks the development of sophisticated building techniques and offers the opportunity to sample a rich variety of regional design types.

HAA 1250 Gothic Architecture

  • 3 credits

This course examines the Gothic cathedral from a number of angles: how it was built; what makes it stand up; what medieval patrons, artists, and facilitators had to say about it; its functional requirements as a liturgical center; and how this mode of architecture developed. Assigned readings will be taken from a text and from a variety of sources. Students will also be expected to write a paper of about ten pages or carry out an equivalent creative project.

HAA 1305 Early Renaissance Architecture

  • 3 credits
  • offered every once every two years

The Early Renaissance (1420-1500) in Italy marked a fundamental change in the way mankind saw and thought about the world and their built environment. This course examines the buildings, cities, projects, and theories of that period through its major designers. It concentrates on the new acceptance of rationality and modular linkage in building, which prefigures the rationality and scientific method characteristic of the modern world.

HAA 1306 High Renaissance Architecture

  • 3 credits
  • offered once every two years

The architecture of the High Renaissance and Mannerism (from about 1500 to about 1580 in Rome and other centers of Italy) changed forever the face of architecture. This course begins with epochal projects by Bramante, Raphael, Michelangelo and (on paper) Leonardo da Vinci. It then follows the mutation of High Renaissance ideals into Mannerism and the dispersion of both styles in northern Italy, particularly in town planning and in the villas and churches of Andrea Palladio around Venice. We end with a survey of what the Renaissance style looked like when it was exported to France, Spain, Germany, and England.

HAA 1405 Art & Architecture of the Eighteenth Century

  • 3 credits

The discovery of Pompeii, the beginnings of industrial architecture, fierce rationalism in the architectural theory of neoclassicism, far-out romanticism in “instant ruins” that were built in England and France, the luxuriousness of French and German Rococo, the towering strength of buildings by Ledoux and Boulée--what era promised more (and delivered much) in its buildings than the eighteenth century? Like its architecture, the 18th-century was as wildly contradictory and dynamic in its painting and art criticism. Lush eroticism in Fragonard and Boucher meets the stern Republican classicism of David, the nightmarish visions of the Sturm und Drang, the natural elegance of Vigée-Lebrun, the longing of Winckelmann, the penetrating gaze of Joseph Wright of Derby, Goya’s macabre condemnations, and Romanticism’s unrequited search for solace in nature. In this age of Revolution, these were the birth-pangs of the modern era as art, the role of the artist and the function of art in public life were redefined. This course traces these shifts, eruptions, conflicts and developments through the “long” 18th-century, 1700-1825, with special emphasis on its unruliness, and on the interchange of architecture, painting, art theory and criticism.

 

HAA 1407 18th-Century Architecture: Enlightenment Thought and the Uses of Space

  • 3 credits

This course will examine architecture, city planning, interior design, and gardening in eighteenth-century Europe as the product of social, industrial, administrative, and intellectual transformations that began to radically challenge traditional spatial configurations and conventional approaches to building. In cosmopolitan centers like London and Paris, an unprecedented explosion of print media, rapid rises in literacy, and the development of a public sphere outside official power structures opened debate in the arts to previously marginal figures. A range of new voices thus emerged that impacted policy decisions in the urban realm and proffered advice and guidance in thinking about aesthetics and artistic production. The rise of science held out the possibility that cities and institutions could be reshaped to improve human welfare through better hygiene and the expansion of commerce. Influential new classes defined by wealth or specialized knowledge generated the creation of building types for a range of new activities. Elite domestic space in particular reflects a wholesale transformation of social priorities motivated by the novel concept of privacy. Narrowly defined Renaissance discourses on the arts founded exclusively on the model of ancient Rome collapsed under an avalanche of data gathered in remote sites around the Mediterranean and through contact with more far-flung civilizations around the world. New intellectual paradigms reconfigured the relationship between individual and nature, between modern present and historical past. Consequently, the purpose of architecture mutated in the course of the eighteenth century as a bewildering range of new possibilities for shaping building and reshaping social relations were explored. Well before political Revolution rocked European governments and toppled traditional hierarchies, the built environment served as a laboratory for experimentation and as a forum for reimagining society.


HAA 1530 Early American Architecture

  • 3 credits
  • offered once every two years

Architecture often serves as a prime document and indicator of America’s past and future. The theme of this course is the search for identity in American architecture in the centuries from the colonial settlements to the Civil War. The course studies both the recorded history of American architecture and the unrecorded millennium before that, to show its surprising cohesion in the face of great cultural and territorial diversity. The first part of the course particularly stresses archaeological evidence and historic preservation; throughout the course the instructor and the students will together be “reading” the buildings both for their own visual pleasures and as documents of American society.

HAA 1531 Modern American Architecture

  • 3 credits
  • offered once every two years

By the time the Civil War ended in 1865, traditional American architectural values had broken down under a barrage of ornament and imported European styles. Something new had to take shape to express the new wealth of post-Civil War America and the new social order that went with it. The next 135 years would see a succession of brilliant architects in Furness, Richardson, the early skyscraper builders in Chicago, Sullivan, the firm of McKim, Mead and White, Frank Lloyd Wright, Mies, Kahn, Venturi, Moore, Gehry, Predock, Holl, Arquitectonica, and the pluralists of today. At the same time, these successes also masked major problems: spoiling the land; architecture as social welfare; and the concern for national and regional values as expressed in building. These individual successes and collective problems will constitute the underlying theme of the course.

HAA 1601 Special Topics (Japanese) - Issues of Authority in Japanese Art and Architecture

  • 3 credits

This course will examine Japanese buildings, sculpture, and paintings as mediums for creating metaphors of meaning and as vehicles for the expression of authority.  The objects that we will study represent a wide range of historical time-periods and include ancient Shinto shrines, Buddhist temples, and decorated palaces, castles, and mausolea.

HAA 1630 History of Chinese Architecture

  • 3 credits

This course is designed to study Chinese architecture and society by considering such topics as: the Chinese idea of space; the beginnings and growth of Chinese cities, including Imperial centers, buildings and building programs, palaces, administrative centers, capital complexes, trade centers, and royal gardens; religious centers and buildings, including Buddhist, Daoist and Confucian buildings; and domestic buildings and the art of fengshui in practice.

HAA 1880 World Cities

  • 3 credits

What is a city? The sociologist, the anthropologist, the political scientist, the regional planner, and the geographer all see cities from their different perspectives. But the art historian has an important contribution too: cities have been seen for millennia as works of art. Even cities as seemingly “messy” as Las Vegas or Calcutta have an urban form that the art historian can decipher with special expertise. This course looks at the city, both Western and non-Western, to discover its main patterns of urban form and development.  Through lectures and discussions, students derive the basic format by which to analyze these patterns.  Pittsburgh itself serves as one of several “test cases” in piecing together that format. (If practicable, students will use camcorders to record their visual impressions of it.)  Lectures and readings give students the chronological and typological base from which to sharpen their own analytical skills.  The principles derived in the early sessions will be used in the final course segment, in which students work on the form and growth of world cities they have selected to study.

HAA 1907 Architecture and the City in Central Europe

  • 6 credits

After the demolition in 1858 of the obsolete fortifications surrounding Vienna, the capital of the Hapsburg Empire was rapidly transformed into one of the most innovative and modern cities in the world.  The development of the Ringstrasse into a boulevard of parks, public squares and grand institutional buildings – comparable to the vast and virtually simultaneous interventions that transformed Paris during the Second Empire – made Vienna a model for other European cities.  At the turn of the 20th century, Vienna was a showcase for sophisticated architecture and urban planning, and one of the major centers for architectural training in Eastern Europe.

 

This course will examine the transformation of Vienna and the development of a distinctive school of architectural thought that produced some of the principal theorists connected with the emergence of modernism in the early 20th century.  The dissemination and adaptation of the Viennese model will be considered in relation to projects undertaken in two provincial capitals – Zagreb and Ljubljana – where architects trained in Vienna and other European centers applied ideas developed in the capital to the periphery.

Major architectural themes that will be emphasized in this course include:

(1) the development of different building types to serve modern needs (museums, hospitals, apartment housing, villa or pavilion type housing);

(2) tectonics and the expression of construction; (3) debates about the function and meaning of ornament; (4) historic preservation and building restoration.

 

The written and built works of the following major central European architects will be examined in detail: Jozef Hoffmann, Adolf Loos, Josef Marie Olbrich, Jože Plečnik, Gottfried Semper, and Otto Wagner, as well as one house in Vienna designed by the philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein

 

Classes will be held primarily on-site in Vienna and Zagreb.  Students will be required to participate in discussions, apply theoretical ideas from major 19th- and 20th-century authors to the observation of buildings, and document sites through note-taking, drawing, measuring, and photography. Students will be given some training in basic techniques for documenting sites through drawing, measurement, and photography.

HAA 1950 Senior Thesis

  • 3 credits

This W-course requires the writing of a research paper. The student should discuss a topic with a faculty member and write the paper under that faculty member's supervision. This course is open to History of Art and Architecture majors with an overall QPA of 3.5 and a departmental QPA of 3.5. Successful completion of this course with a A- or higher, and the completion of all requirements for the intensive major will enable the student to graduate with departmental honors.

DEPARTMENT OF STUDIO ARTS

SA 0110 Foundation Design

  • 3 credits
  • required for architectural studies majors

This course is a survey of concepts, methods, and issues of Design as a vehicle of visual organization, structure, thought, and expression. The broad scope of the subject is explored through lectures, discussions, critiques, and the process of making images, and objects. Students are introduced to the dynamics of composition, form and content, color systems and theory, aesthetic issues, visual analysis, perception, spatial structure and the value of visual awareness and creativity in an increasingly image-oriented culture. The course also seeks to provide some experience with a variety of media, develop skills in observation and technique, and encourage personal involvement in resolving a visual problem or expressing an idea. Projects focus on specific concepts, preparation and planning, and creative visual thinking. The course offers a relevant introduction and insight into the process of making art. This course is open to art majors and non-art majors. The course requires the purchase of art materials and supplies. There is a $15.00 lab fee.

SA 0130 Foundation Drawing

  • 3 credits
  • required for architectural studies majors

Foundation Drawing is designed to give both majors and non-majors a comprehensive introduction to the art of drawing. The course approaches drawing as a unique graphic and expressive medium rather than as a preliminary or planning process. The course begins from the point of view that the expressive and interpretative potential of drawing can be achieved at the beginning level when knowledge of drawing media and techniques are fused with personal vision and creativity. Drawing 0130 follows a sequence of studies that introduce students to basic drawing media and compositional elements through observation of natural and manufactured forms. The course culminates with an introduction to the human figure. There is a $15.00 lab fee.

SA 0140 Foundation Sculpture [required for architectural studies majors]

  • 3 credits
  • required for architectural studies majors

Foundation-Sculpture is a broadly based course that introduces students to the expressive potential of modeled and constructed form. Throughout the course, students experience a variety of sculpture techniques and materials in projects that study certain characteristics of natural and abstract form. The principle goals of the course are to develop skills and to provide a basis for individual creative development. From this course, students should gain sensitivity in the observation of form, develop analytic and compositional skills and begin to formulate ideas through practical experience. The individual must purchase basic sculpture tools. There is a $20.00 lab fee.

SA 1430 Perspective Drawing [required for architectural studies majors]

  • 3 credits
  • required for architectural studies majors

This course is designed to provide the student with a working knowledge of the fundamental theories of linear perspective and the role they play in the development of a drawing. The focus is on understanding how these conventions work as an integral part of the drawing process and how to apply them to specific applications. Throughout the term, the class will progress from setting up simple drawings to more complex perspectival compositions. Art materials will be assigned at the beginning of the term. There is a $15 lab fee.

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS

MATH 0220 Analytical Geometry and Calculus 1

  • 3 credits

This is the first course in the basic calculus sequence and is intended for all mathematics, engineering, science, and statistics students. Math 0220 covers the derivative and integral of functions of a single variable. A lab component in which students apply numeric, algebraic, and graphing technologies to calculus problems is an integral part of the course. For addition information refer to the web page http://calculus.math.pitt.edu. A scientific calculator is required, preferably a graphing calculator. One-letter grade rule applies if there is a common final exam.

MATH 0230 Analytical Geometry and Calculus 2

  • 3 credits

This is the second course in the basic calculus sequence and is intended for all mathematics, engineering, science, and statistics students. Math 0230 covers symbolic and numerical integration techniques and applications, modeling, differential equations, and Taylor series. A lab component in which students apply numeric, algebraic, and graphing technologies to calculus problems is an integral part of the course. For addition information, refer to the web page http://calculus.math.pitt.edu. A scientific calculator is required, preferably a graphing calculator. One-letter grade rule applies if there is a common final exam.

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY

PHYS 0110 Introduction to Physics 1

  • 3 credits

This is the first term in a two-term lecture-demonstration sequence that presents the elements of both classical and modern physics. The emphasis of the course is on a clear understanding of the underlying principles rather than on mathematical formalism and problem-solving (although some attention is given to these aspects of physics). This course is appropriate for non-science majors, and for those majoring in the social, psychological and life sciences that do not need the more mathematically oriented course required of engineering and physical science students (Physics 0174,0175). The introductory laboratory course to be associated with this sequence is Physics 0212 (see below) which should be taken after Physics 0110. Credit will not be given for both this sequence and the Physics 0174, 0175 sequence. Subjects covered in the course include: kinematics; Newtonian mechanics; heat and thermodynamics; kinetic theory.

PHYS 0174 Basic Physical Science and Engineering 1 (Integrated)

  • 3 credits
  • required for the certificate in Civil Engineering

The first term in a two-term introductory lecture-demonstration sequence in physics for science and engineering students. Calculus is used as needed and should be taken at least concurrently. Credit will not be given for both this sequence and the PHYS 0110 – PHYS 0111 sequence. Subjects covered in Physics 0174 include: kinematics; Newton's laws of motion; energy; momentum, rotational motion, rigid body motion, angular momentum, simple harmonic motion, gravitation, mechanical waves, sound waves, and the kinetic theory of gases.

PHYS 0175 Basic Physical Science and Engineering 2 (Integrated)

  • 3 credits
  • required for the certificate in Civil Engineering

This is the second term in a two-term (0174 and 0175) introductory sequence in physics for science and engineering students. Subjects covered in Physics 0175 include: electrostatics, electric currents, magnetism, induction, simple AC circuits, Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic waves, geometric and wave optics, followed by an introduction to quantum physics, including photons, the Bohr atom and spectra, and elementary wave mechanics. Students planning to major in physics are urged to take the equivalent honors course (Physics 0476).

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